The Snobbery of the Covid Narrative and Its Functions

Introduction

The Official Covid Narrative, the idea that Covid-19 is an extremely dangerous disease that requires severe mitigation strategies such as lockdown, views human beings as simply disease carriers. However, some categories of people are viewed more as disease carriers than others by the official narrative, and specifically by the believers in that narrative. The narrative itself is inherently linked to certain middle and upper class attitudes about the working classes and their beliefs and pursuits. This is seen through the demonisation of working class people for carrying out ordinary everyday activities and for being sceptical of big pharma.

The Great Unwashed

From 23 March 2020, near the entirety of the country was compliant with Boris Johnson’s draconian lockdowns. As someone who was a sceptic of the narrative from the beginning, it was depressing and almost hopeless to see the state of the country at that time.

The first possible signs of actual social life came about through the suggestion of V.E. Day anniversary celebrations. 8th May 2020 marked the 75th anniversary of the defeat of Nazi Germany, so at that point the British people had endured about 6 weeks of lockdown. This was the first sign of life in the country since the beginning of the tyranny.

This is when the middle class handwringing started. The idea of celebrating V.E. Day does not suit middle class Remainer sensibilities, as they consider it to be too nationalistic. They already had a negative conception of the ‘insular’ working class who largely voted for Brexit, so they were already psychologically primed for mass demonisation. And now the working class were to commit the mortal sin in the minds of middle class hypochondriacs: going outside to celebrate a holiday.

Furthermore, there were images of packed beaches from the late spring and summer of 2020. The media salivated over these images, mocking and cursing those who went to the beach. This article provides an example of such strategies, entitled ‘Bournemouth raises alarm as huge crowds ignore COVID advice and flock to the coast’. People having a good time in good weather is now considered to be a ‘major incident’.

The Great Unjabbed

Since the rollout of the Covid 19 injections to the population at large, the demonisation has been squarely aimed at the unjabbed. The official narrative had divided the population into two halves: the virtuous ‘fully vaccinated’ (and now ‘boosted’) populations, and the selfish, evil ‘unvaccinated’ who are subhuman vectors of disease.

Leaving the irrationality of this narrative aside for a moment, here is a large dose of snobbery behind the demonisation of the ‘unvaccinated’. The reality is, people from poorer communities and racial minorities are much less likely to have taken the jabs than middle class white people.

Official government data is contested when it comes to how many people have actually taken the jabs. The government likes to cite a figure of 5m ‘unvaccinated’, making the uninjected quite a small minority. The Expose has used another government document to contest this, claiming this document shows that in fact 15.3m eligible people have not taken a single dose.

Even according to the more official data, however, take up is lower in poorer and ethnic minority communities. The website OpenSafely.org gives data on vaccine coverage in the UK (and is linked and used as a source by the BBC, so it’s establishment approved). Their charts clearly show that ethnic minorities and more deprived areas have a lower vaccination take up. Even if the numbers themselves are overshot per The Expose above, I doubt that the trends themselves are inaccurate.

The demonisation of the ‘unvaccinated’ thus has a clear class element.

There is also another aspect to this which we saw strongly during the Brexit argument and that is the ‘working class are stupid’ aspect. The Guardian published an article called ‘Understanding, not judgment, should shape our response to those who remain unjabbed’ which is full of the kind of talking down beloved of middle class British liberals.

By way of getting to the heart of it all, a PowerPoint presentation she sent me made mention of “historic lack of trust in public institutions including health services within some groups and communities”. In some black communities, she said, people’s relationships with authority are so poor that that some have chosen to be vaccinated well away from where they live and work, “because they’re almost embarrassed to be vaccinated, thinking their community isn’t behind them.” She paused. “There’s no easy fix. We just keep on talking.”

The implication of this article is that we need some nice middle class liberals to go and talk to these ‘stupid’ black people who don’t trust authority. There’s no consideration here that people may have actually said no and mean no and have the agency to do so.

This is the flipside to the demonisation of the ‘unvaccinated’ as subhuman – they can either be maliciously subhuman, in that they are purposeful granny killers, or they can be stupidly subhuman, in that they require enlightenment by the evangelists of the Covid Cult.

Alongside this narrative, the traditional ‘working class activity’ snobbery continued, with people attending the Euro 2020(1) football tournament being demonised for their attendance. Meanwhile, Wimbledon – of more middle class interest happening at the same time – did not cause the same demonisation from the middle class dominated media.

The Covid Scam Is An Attack on Working People

There is a more serious point to all of this snobbery, which is that the Covid narrative is an attack on ordinary working people in a multitude of ways. This attack is justified through this snobbery in the minds of the petty middle class, who are already inclined to view the working class as ignorant Brexit voters who ruined their nice holidays in Marbella.

Lockdown is a war on the working class. Firstly, it is an attack on the rights of the working class to congregate and organise politically in order to represent their interests, as well as to protest against the governments and corporations imposing poor working conditions and wages on them.

Lockdown is also an economic war against the working class and a massive transfer of wealth upwards from ordinary people. Multiple sources have highlighted this massive growth in wealth, including many that are supporters of the Official Covid Narrative. According to inequality.org:

The world’s billionaires have seen their wealth surge by over $5.5 trillion since the beginning of the pandemic in March 2020, a gain of over 68 percent. The world’s 2,690 global billionaires saw their combined wealth rise from $8 trillion on March 20, 2020 to $13.5 trillion as of July 31, 2021, drawing on data from Forbes.

Global billionaire total wealth has increased more over the past 17 months of the pandemic than it did in the 15 years prior to the pandemic. Between 2006 and 2020, global billionaire wealth increased from $2.65 trillion to $8 trillion, a gain of $5.35 trillion.

Whereas Oxfam reports:

With unprecedented support from governments for their economies, the stock market has been booming, driving up billionaire wealth, even while the real economy faces the deepest recession in a century. In contrast, after the financial crisis in 2008, it took five years for billionaire wealth to return to its pre-crisis highs.

Worldwide, billionaires’ wealth increased by a staggering $3.9tn (trillion)
between 18 March and 31 December 2020.28 Their total wealth now stands
at $11.95tn, which is equivalent to what G20 governments have spent
in response to the pandemic. The world’s 10 richest billionaires have
collectively seen their wealth increase by $540bn over this period.

Working class wealth has nosedived due to the lockdowns. Workers have been forced to work from home and this has increased their exploitation according to Ted Reese:

Much of the workplace has been moved to the home, saving capital costs on office space; pushing running costs such as electricity and water bills onto workers; and making them work longer hours, all combining to deepen the rate of their exploitation. About 30% of remote workers in a UK survey said they were working more unpaid hours than before lockdown, with 18% reporting at least four additional unpaid hours a week. According to an ADP Research Institute study, employees globally are now working 9.2 hours per week of unpaid overtime on average, up from 7.3 hours in a year.

The terrible inflation we are currently observing – at least partially caused by the lockdowns – is another aspect of war on the working class. The middle classes can weather this inflation through higher wages and the money they accrued while getting paid free cash on furlough. This isn’t an option for the working class.

The mandatory Covid injections implemented by the establishment are also an attack on the bodily integrity of the working class. The government forced care home workers to take these injections or they would be fired. Care home workers are poorly paid members of the working class, with an average wage of £8.50 an hour. They are also primarily women. Care home workers were fired from their jobs for not taking these injections in December 2021, or were forced to leave and find other work. Although the mandate was later repealed the damage was done in terms of lost wages and jobs. Other countries are still implementing such policies.

Snobbery also allows for the demonisation of resistance to the authoritarian project launched in the name of ‘fighting Covid’. This has been seen most notably in the case of the ‘Freedom Convoy’. The Convoy emerged in Canada in response to Justin Trudeau’s particularly authoritarian Covid measures. In response other convoys have taken inspiration for their own movements including in the UK. Due to the fact that this movement is founded by working class people, it has been demonised by people in the media and their woke left allies. The movement has been smeared as ‘white supremacist’ (despite the clear participation of people of all races).

The portion of the left that hates the working classes has also been brought in to smear the convoys as ‘right wing’. One example is previously respected anti-imperialist commentator Ben Norton, who has been demonising people opposed to the injection mandates:

The same line is being parroted by the liberal media that the likes of Norton claim to oppose. The Conversation ran a hit piece on the truckers, claiming that because they aren’t virtue signalling about ‘transphobia’ they don’t care about freedom and that they want the freedom to kill people because they reject mandating an experimental injection. This demonisation helps to keep the middle classes in the Covid propaganda bubble.

Conclusion

One function of lockdowns was a massive transfer of wealth to the rich from the poor and working class. The political acceptability of such a project – in the UK in particular – was maintained through the demonisation of the working classes.

One thought on “The Snobbery of the Covid Narrative and Its Functions

  1. Rob Rob

    Many forget that we have had 2 decades of inflation in housing, but most thought it was a good thing cause “net worth”and “investment value”.
    Also I remember during Bush, gas was this high back then.
    The media is using inflation to distract us from past inflation and distract us from the jab issues.

    Like

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